Plans For California Health Insurance Exchange Take Shape

California officials are working to make health insurance for California more affordable and value-based with plans for an Internet-based exchange. The plan is expected to not only help individual consumers, but to also help business owners struggling with escalating California health insurance rates.In California, health insurance premium increases have outpaced the rate of inflation by more than four fold. While the state’s overall inflation rate has increased 23.1 percent since 2002, California health insurance premiums increased by 117.5 percent.In the legislature, attempts to bring rate increases under regulatory control were defeated by insurance companies in 2008, 2009 and 2010. Determined to gain authority similar to that already in existence in some other states where regulators can prevent unwarranted rate hikes, California legislators have proposed a like-minded bill in the current session.California Health Insurance Exchange Is Based On Working ModelIn Southern California, the country’s oldest and most successful California health insurance exchange already serves more than 150,000 members and almost 12,000 employers. CaliforniaChoice has been in operation for 15 years and provides a successful working model for the future exchange.Growing out of the Affordable Care Act that became law in 2010, the new California health insurance exchange is meant to give consumers greater choice in health plans. Something similar to an Internet-based shopping mall is being designed to expand access for individuals and employers to see how health plans stack up to each other in side-by-side comparisons.Health Insurance For California Will Provide A Standard Set Of BenefitsTo protect consumers from the “small print” that can conceal exclusions and limits to significantly reduce coverage consumers may think they are buying, the California health insurance exchange will have a standard set of benefits. Health care services will cover specific benefits while offering different levels of cost sharing, such as co-pays and co-insurance.The Affordable Care Act not only has provisions to make health coverage more transparent, but it also includes government subsidies to share access to health care with U.S. citizens who can’t afford the cost of California health insurance premiums. Financial help will be based on family size and income.The new exchange may for the first time give individuals and employers the chance to enjoy health plan that is similar to what members of Congress have. Employers who still offer health plan benefits will need to change how they provide coverage to transition into using the new exchange. Employers can provide employees with voucher-like premium contributions. Employees can use these to select a health plan from several plan options at different benefit levels and prices through the exchange.With greater clarity and standardization among health care plans offered through the state exchange, comparing California health plan quotes will be easier and give consumers a more realistic idea of what they are actually purchasing. They’ll also enjoy an increased sense of oversight.Perhaps the days of bogus health plans being freely sold will come to end in the near future. As we’ve recently seen, regulation has not protected consumers who faithfully paid insurance premiums only to discover their medical bills were never paid because an insurance company was allowed to take their money without maintaining the funds to pay for claims.While still a work-in-progress, the California health plan exchange may be a first step toward making access to health care more of a fair business exchange and less of a gamble. Extending health care services to more citizens has benefits that go far beyond benefits for individuals, families and small business owners. Withholding care until emergency services are required has a much higher cost for society than offering preventive care. In terms of both financial and moral costs, the new state exchange shows great promise.

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GIRL POWER! Is Good Mental Health

GIRL POWER! is paving the way for girls to build confidence, competence, and pride in themselves, in other words, enhancing girls’ mental wellness. Girl Power! is also providing messages and materials to girls about the risks and consequences associated with substance abuse and with potential mental health concerns. For instance, did you know:Girls are seven times more likely than boys to be depressed and twice as likely to attempt suicide.*Girls are three times more likely than boys to have a negative body image (often reflected in eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia).*One in five girls in the U.S. between the ages of 12 and 17 drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes.*Girls who develop positive interpersonal and social skills decrease their risk of substance abuse.*Girls who have an interest and ability in areas such as academics, the arts, sports, and community activities are more likely to develop confidence and may be less likely to use drugs.*On the other hand, this also is a time when girls may make decisions to try risky behaviors, including drinking, smoking, and using drugs.*The Girl Power! Campaign, under the leadership of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is collaborating with the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) to provide this valuable mental health information.* Girl Power! Hometown Media Kit, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 1997.Substance Abuse and Mental HealthResults from a study of nearly 6,000 people aged 15 to 24 show that among young people with a history of both a mental disorder and an addictive disorder, the mental disorder is usually reported to have occurred first. The onset of mental health problems may occur about 5 to 10 years before the substance abuse disorders.**This provides a “window of opportunity” for targeted substance abuse prevention interventions and needed mental health services.** “National Comorbidity Survey,” Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D., et al., American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, June 1996.What Is Mental Health?Mental health is how we think, feel, and act in order to face life’s situations. It is how we look at ourselves, our lives, and the people we know and care about. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, evaluate our options, and make choices. Everyone has mental health.A young girl’s mental health affects her daily life and future. Schoolwork, relationships, and physical health can be affected by mental health. Like physical health, mental health is important at every stage of life. Caring for and protecting a child’s mental health is a major part of helping that child grow to become the best she can be.Girls’ independence is usually encouraged in childhood, and their strengths nurtured. Most girls become emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy young adults. But sometimes, during the transition from childhood to adolescence, extra care is necessary, so that a girl’s self-esteem and coping skills are not diminished. For more information on teen mental health, call 1-800-789-2647 and ask for the brochure: “You and Mental Health: What’s the Deal?” (Order # CA-0002)Nurturing Your Child’s Mental HealthParents and other caregivers are responsible for children’s physical safety and emotional well-being. Parenting styles vary; there is no one right way to raise a child. Clear and consistent expectations for each child, by all caregivers, are important. Many good books are available in libraries or at bookstores on child development, constructive problem-solving, discipline styles, and other parenting skills. The following suggestions are not meant to be complete.Do your best to provide a safe home and community for your child, as well as nutritious meals, regular health check-ups, immunizations, and exercise.Be aware of stages in child development so you don’t expect too much or too little from your child.Encourage your child to express her feelings; respect those feelings. Let your child know that everyone experiences pain, fear, anger, and anxiety.Try to learn the source of these feelings. Help your child express anger positively, without resorting to violence.Promote mutual respect and trust. Keep your voice level down–even when you don’t agree. Keep communication channels open.Listen to your child. Use words and examples your child can understand. Encourage questions.Provide comfort and assurance. Be honest. Focus on the positives. Express your willingness to talk about any subject.Look at your own problem-solving and coping skills. Do you turn to alcohol or drugs? Are you setting a good example? Seek help if you are overwhelmed by your child’s feelings or behaviors or if you are unable to control your own frustration or anger.Encourage your child’s talents and accept limitations.Set goals based on the child’s abilities and interests–not someone else’s expectations. Celebrate accomplishments. Don’t compare your child’s abilities to those of other children; appreciate the uniqueness of your child. Spend time regularly with your child.Foster your child’s independence and self-worth.Help your child deal with life’s ups and downs. Show confidence in your child’s ability to handle problems and tackle new experiences.Discipline constructively, fairly, and consistently. (Discipline is a form of teaching, not physical punishment.) All children and families are different; learn what is effective for your child. Show approval for positive behaviors. Help your child learn from her mistakes.Love unconditionally. Teach the value of apologies, cooperation, patience, forgiveness, and consideration for others. Do not expect to be perfect; parenting is a difficult job. Many good books are available in libraries or at bookstores on child development, constructive problem-solving, discipline styles, and other parenting skills.
Mental Health Problems Many children experience mental health problems that are real and painful and can be severe.Mental health problems affect at least one in every five young people, at any given time. At least 1 in 10 children may have a serious emotional disturbance that severely disrupts his or her ability to function.Tragically an estimated two-thirds of all young people with mental health problems are not getting the help they need. Mental health problems can lead to school failure, alcohol or other drug abuse, family discord, violence, or even suicide.A variety of signs may point to a possible mental health problem in a child or teenager. If you are concerned about a child or have any questions, seek help immediately. Talk to your doctor, a school counselor, or other mental health professionals who are trained to assess whether your child has a mental health problem. For a list of warning signs, call 1-800-789-2647 and ask for the brochure “Your Child’s Mental Health: What Every Family Should Know. (Order # CA-0001)Available HELPThe National Mental Health Information Center, funded by the Center for Mental Health Services, can provide confidential information; free publications; and referrals to local, State, and national resources.Call 1-800-789-2647FAX 240-747-5470(TDD) 866-889-2647